Shaggy black and white dog looking at the camera with owner in the foreground

What Dogs Can Teach Us About Language

For centuries, researchers have been fascinated by the evolution and development of language. How did humans develop the ability to utilize complex language when no other species have? What is it that makes humans unique? One possibility is that the location of language processing in the left hemisphere of our brains allows for the development … Continue reading What Dogs Can Teach Us About Language

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Is it a reading problem, or an oral language problem?

Note:  The ideas underlying this blog post originally came from word-finding expert Dr. Diane German, who was first author on the study discussed here and deserves all credit.  For more information on word-finding, please see Dr. German's website, http://www.wordfinding.com/. Many children with reading problems also have difficulty with oral language.  But one concern has to do … Continue reading Is it a reading problem, or an oral language problem?

Technology, Distractibility, and the Classroom

This is the third in a three-part series by Lucy Erickson looking and the impact of classroom design, and environmental noise on learning. Lucy originally began this discussion at learningscientists.org. Click to read that blog.   I recently had the opportunity to observe instruction in a first grade classroom. The teacher was giving a vocabulary lesson in … Continue reading Technology, Distractibility, and the Classroom

Neuroplasticity in Children

How does the brain change as children grow, and what does this mean for children who experience brain injury? While individuals demonstrate high variability, the young brain is fundamentally different than the adult brain, both in form and in function. Development occurs in different regions at different rates, influenced by the interaction of inheritance, maturation, and … Continue reading Neuroplasticity in Children

Busy Preschool classroom wall, calendar

Visual “Noise,” Distractibility, and Classroom Design

This is the second in a three-part series by Lucy Erickson looking at the impact of classroom design and environmental noise on learning. Lucy originally began this discussion at learningscientists.org. Click to read that blog.   In my last post, I talked about the negative effects that background noise can have on children, particularly in … Continue reading Visual “Noise,” Distractibility, and Classroom Design

Word-finding Difficulties in Children – How the Word Itself Matters

We have all had the annoying experience of being unable to come up with a particular word, even though we are positive we know it, and it is just “on the tip of my tongue”.  For most of us, this situation is, happily, rare.  But for some children, such occurrences are frequent enough that they … Continue reading Word-finding Difficulties in Children – How the Word Itself Matters

Background Noise and Classroom Design

This is the first in a three-part series by Lucy Erickson looking at the impact of classroom design and environmental noise on learning. Lucy originally began this discussion at learningscientists.org. Click to read that blog.   Few would dispute that the physical environment can play an important role in learning. After all, why else would … Continue reading Background Noise and Classroom Design

The Multicultural Side of Material Selection

For speech-language pathologists incorporating diversity into therapy materials can be a nebulous concept. Some basic questions come to mind: What is diversity? For the purposes of this post, we will define diversity as difference and representation. That means, variety and visibility of different cultures and sub-cultures in the materials we select for therapy. Which clients … Continue reading The Multicultural Side of Material Selection

Safe spaces in HESP departments, and the importance of the auxiliary verb

This past year has seen a recent increase in the debate regarding freedom of speech on college campuses, and the issue of "safe spaces".   (See the Washington Post for one editorial from the fall.) And while we often do not think of Hearing and Speech as being the type of topic that is likely … Continue reading Safe spaces in HESP departments, and the importance of the auxiliary verb